Venezuela: US-backed Coup Underway

The attempt to dethrone President Nicolás Maduro has not come out of the blue. Since Maduro became president after the death of Chávez in 2013, the US has resolutely aimed at a regime change.

This is a chain of events totally misrepresented by the western mainstream media, as usual.

The US has tried to persuade parts of the Venezuelan army to turn against Maduro, but without any result so far. That is why Washington relies first and foremost on the internal opposition and on diplomatic pressure.

The US gives assistance to the political opposition and tries to unite it as much as possible. According to the color revolution handbook, NGOs, student organizations and local organizations are funded, trained and coached to organize street riots as effectively as possible. The street violence must destabilize the country to such an extent that the government is forced to resign, or that the army intervenes and deposes the government.

Since 2013, the opposition twice unleashed a cycle of large-scale violence. In 2014, 43 people were killed and 800 injured. In 2017, 131 people died.

In the meantime, the economic situation deteriorated very much. This was mainly the result of an economic model that is extremely dependent on oil prices, but also of an outright economic warfare against the regime.

They lied about Iran. They lied about Vietnam. They lied about Chile. They lied about Iraq. They lied about Afghanistan. They lied about Iraq again. They lied about Libya. They lied about Syria. But yeah, sure, this time (with Venezuela) it’s for a good cause (it’s not).

Venezuela holds sway over a considerable supply of global oil, thus having the ability to influence its price of what is termed “black gold”. In 2017 Venezuela was the seventh largest oil exporter in OPEC, accounting for 6.4% of OPEC’s crude oil exports.

The oil price drop of 2015 which affected Venezuela was a global phenomenon.

Since the formation of OPEC in the 1970s, the Saudi Kingdom has been able to use its immense reserves to undermine other oil-producing countries’ attempts to maintain a high and stable price for petroleum. Even if all these nations were to ally, the Saudi Kingdom can turn the tap up or down and change the entire global economy to benefit its own geopolitical agenda and that of its U.S. patron. It did so in the late 1970s to offset lowered production in Iran after the 1979 revolution. And it did so again in 2015, partly in response to the success of the Iran-U.S. nuclear deal. It’s not a perfect mechanism; the price drop hurt the Saudi economy before prices slowly climbed anew. But the most severe effects were felt by the United States’ designated enemies: Russia, Iran and Venezuela.

Weaponized oil prices are a useful tool in globalist conquest, one piece on the chessboard worth holding. But President Maduro seems to be immune to the temptation of the western bribe or its callous threats.

Now he will have to stand the test of an offer he perhaps cannot refuse; the embargoes and bloodshed that have and will continue to befall his nation for his “lack of cooperation”. This is, as Russia states, a “direct path to bloodshed”. This prophesy is quickly becoming true as Maduro has called for the expansion of armed civilian militias as the threat of more violence on the streets of Caracas continues to grow. The militias, created by deceased former president Hugo Chávez to resist “imperialist aggression,” currently consist of about 100,000 members. Maduro’s proposed expansion of the civilian force would increase its size to 500,000.

Furthermore, up to 400 Russian military contractors are in Venezuela to beef-up security for Maduro, according to reports.

Maduro’s announcement was accompanied by a rousing speech in which he called upon Venezuelans to decide if they are “with the homeland” or against it, adding that “now is not the time to hesitate.”

A lengthy western media onslaught has pinned Venezuela’s economic troubles on Maduro’s regime; ignoring western trade embargoes entirely, not to mention the geopolitical significance of Venezuela’s oil supply and its closeness to Russia and China. It is in imperialist interests to subjugate Venezuela.

If the opposition does ultimately capture the presidency, the best-case scenario is that Venezuela adopts the ruinous austerity policies of Macri’s Argentina or Temer’s Brazil. The worst-case scenario could look something like the U.S.-led occupation of Haiti, with the country’s oil industry turned over to the multinationals, like Iraq’s was more than a decade ago.

Juan Guaidó: the western choice for regime change in Venezuela.

Maduro says Venezuela is “the victim of a US conspiracy,” referring to reports that US Vice President Mike Pence promised Guaido full American support the day before he declared himself Venezuela’s new leader. An act of unabashed interference and sponsorship in foreign elections.

Maduro has spoken at length on the situation:

“This is the reason for the coup. They don’t want us to get better. They sabotage us and try to destroy the (Venezuelan) economic system.”

“We will continue denouncing US lies, and I will continue to encourage national dialogue because I am up for a dialogue with all the political opposition, with the opposition media,” he said. “I think dialogue should prevail. I believe in dialogue.”

Guaidó is the thirty-five-year-old president of Parliament. He is very close toLeopoldo López, with whom he is in daily contact, despite his house arrest. Together they founded the right-wing party Voluntad Popular. In the past, this party organised armed pickets that killed people, set fire to public buildings and hospitals, led to attacks on ministries, etc.

Strengthened by Trump’s backing, the opposition took to the streets the same day with the aim of ousting President Maduro and forming a provisional government. Amnesty was promised to the military who would defect. Six days later, on 21 January, some rebellious soldiers posted a video message online in which they declared themselves loyal to the opposition leader.

Tensions increased. On 22 January, Mike Pence, vice president of the US, posted a video message calling on Venezuelans to take to the streets and get rid of Maduro. One day later, the opposition did what Pence asked, they massively took to the streets. There were also large counter-demonstrations by supporters of the government. Guaidó proclaimed himself the new president. He was immediately recognized by the governments of the US, Brazil and Canada, among others. Russia, China, Turkey and Mexico, a large and important country in the region, continue to recognize Maduro. Europe takes a cautious and moderate position.

The situation as it unfolds.

It is unlikely that the recognition of Guaidó by the US and some other countries will bring down President Maduro. But it may lead to further destabilisation of the country. The White House has opted for the strategy of chaos, as it has already done in so many other places.

The recognition of Guaidó will give the opposition a boost. If Guaidó is not allowed to hold the presidency, this may lead to more economic sanctions. The US is currently considering a ban on oil imports. This would have serious consequences for Venezuela’s financial position and would further reduce oil production.

An increasing number of recognitions of Guiadó as president will make it more likely that more countries will adopt economic sanctions against Venezuela. Threatening sanctions, stronger opposition and increasing violence will intensify the pressure on military officers and the PSUV top, in the hope that they will eventually change camps.

At the moment a foreign military intervention is unlikely, even with escalating violence. But in the past Trump has not ruled out such an intervention. With the recent election of the belligerent Bolsonaro, such an intervention could possibly be outsourced by the US to Brazil, together with Colombia, Peru and other countries in the region.

In any case, the interference in the domestic affairs of a sovereign country that the US is exhibiting today is unashamed and unprecedented. It violates the most elementary principles of the United Nations.

The deadlock in Venezuela can only be resolved through national dialogue. Maduro, for his part, is in favor of calling for a dialogue, directed to the country as a whole by the governments of Uruguay and Mexico. Any foreign interference or pressure will only add fuel to the flames.

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Venezuela: Economic Warfare Brings Nation To Its Knees

Featured article from Mint Press News.

Which is mightier; the pen or the sword? In the case of the recent upheaval in Venezuela, the pen is the obvious answer.

The bankers fight using the pen — the pen that signs the paperwork to impose the sanctions that incur mass starvation, dissolve order, hike prices, and bring nations to their knees — Venezuela is in the crosshairs this time.

Last year, U.S. President Donald Trump signed a determination that singled out Venezuela for failing to adhere to counternarcotics obligations. The accusation came – perhaps not so coincidentally – on the same day that Venezuela declared it would no longer participate in the U.S.’ petrodollar trade system.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro made his position clear, he had stated earlier in that month that the country would look to “free” itself from the dollar within a week’s time, following the U.S.’ sanctions against the embattled nation.

The decision is similar to that once made by former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, who dropped the dollar in favor of the euro a few years prior to the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, we all know how that ended.

International markets thus far have failed to noticeably react to the policy shift, despite the threat it presents to the petrodollar system. The system, created in the 1970s, calls for OPEC nations to sell their oil in dollars in order to create artificial demand for the U.S. currency, a fiat currency based on thin air — held together by force.

Venezuela, home to the world’s largest oil reserves, is likely to exert some effect on the demand for dollars through its new policy, though the extent of the potential damage remains unclear. What is clear is that it means enough for the U.S. to declare a financial soft war in retaliation.

Millions of Venezuelans have seen their living conditions vastly improved through the Bolivarian process which shifted the focus away from compliance to the Western Banking Cartel.

The problems plaguing the Venezuelan economy are not due to some inherent fault in socialism, but to artificially low oil prices and sabotage by forces hostile to the revolution.

Starting in 2014, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia flooded the market with cheap oil. This is not a mere business decision, but a calculated move coordinated with U.S. and Israeli foreign policy goals. Despite not just losing money, but even falling deep into debt, the Saudi monarchy continues to expand its oil production apparatus. The result has been driving the price of oil down from $110 per barrel, to $28 in the early months of this year. The goal is to weaken these opponents of Wall Street, London, and Tel Aviv, whose economies are centered around oil and natural gas exports.

Venezuela is one of those countries. Saudi efforts to drive down oil prices have drastically reduced Venezuela’s state budget and led to enormous consequences for the Venezuelan economy.

At the same time, private food processing and importing corporations launched a coordinated campaign of sabotage. This, coupled with the weakening of a vitally important state sector of the economy, has resulted in inflation and food shortages. The artificially low oil prices have left the Venezuelan state cash-starved, prompting a crisis in the funding of the social programs that were key to strengthening the United Socialist Party.

Corruption is a big problem in Venezuela and many third-world countries. This was true prior to the Bolivarian process, as well as after Hugo Chavez launched his massive economic reforms. In situations of extreme poverty, people learn to take care of each other. People who work in government are almost expected to use their position to take care of their friends and family. Corruption is a big problem under any system, but it is much easier to tolerate in conditions of greater abundance. The problem has been magnified in Venezuela due to the drop in state revenue caused by the low oil prices and sabotage from food importers.

Venezuelans told of how the privatizations mandated by the International Monetary Fund made life in Venezuela almost unlivable during the 1990s. Garbage wouldn’t be collected. Electricity would go off for weeks. Haido Ortega, a member of a local governing body in Venezuela, said: “Under previous governments we had to burn tires and go on strike just to get electricity, have the streets fixed, or get any investment.”

Chavez took office on a platform advocating a path between capitalism and socialism. He restructured the government-owned oil company so that the profits would go into the Venezuelan state, not the pockets of Wall Street corporations. With the proceeds of Venezuela’s oil exports, Chavez funded a huge apparatus of social programs.

After defeating an attempted coup against him in 2002, Chavez announced the goal of bringing Venezuela toward “21st Century Socialism.” Chavez quoted Marx and Lenin in his many TV addresses to the country, and mobilized the country around the goal of creating a prosperous, non-capitalist society.

In 1998, Venezuela had only 12 public universities, today it has 32. Cuban doctors were brought to Venezuela to provide free health care in community clinics. The government provides cooking and heating gas to low-income neighborhoods, and it’s launched a literacy campaign for uneducated adults.

During the George W. Bush administration, oil prices were the highest they had ever been. The destruction of Iraq, sanctions on Iran and Russia, strikes and turmoil in Nigeria — these events created a shortage on the international markets, driving prices up.

Big oil revenues enabled Chavez and the United Socialist Party to bring millions of Venezuelans out of poverty. Between 1995 and 2009, poverty and unemployment in Venezuela were both cut in half.

After the death of Chavez, Nicolas Maduro has continued the Bolivarian program. “Housing Missions” have been built across the country, providing low-income families in Venezuela with places to live. The Venezuelan government reports that over 1 million modern apartment buildings had been constructed by the end of 2015.

The problems currently facing Venezuela started in 2014. The already growing abundance of oil due to hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, was compounded by Saudi Arabia flooding the markets with cheap oil. The result: massive price drops. Despite facing a domestic fiscal crisis, Saudi Arabia continues to expand its oil production apparatus.

The price of oil remains low, as negotiations among OPEC states are taking place in the hopes that prices can be driven back up. While American media insists the low oil prices are just the natural cycle of the market at work, it’s rather convenient for U.S. foreign policy. Russia, Venezuela, Ecuador, and the Islamic Republic of Iran all have economies centered around state-owned oil companies and oil exports, and each of these countries has suffered the sting of low oil prices.

The leftist president of Brazil, Dilma Rousseff, has already been deposed due to scandal surrounding Petrobras, the state-owned oil company which is experiencing economic problems due to the falling price of oil. Although much of Brazil’s oil is for domestic consumption, it has been revealed that those who deposed her coordinated with the CIA and other forces in Washington and Wall Street, utilizing the economic fallout of low oil prices to bring down the Brazilian president.

The son of President Ronald Reagan has argued that Obama intentionally drove down oil prices not just to weaken the Venezuelan economy, but also to tamper the influence of Russia and Iran, Trump has continued this foreign policy.

Writing for Townhall in 2014, Michael Reagan bragged that his father did the same thing to hurt the Soviet Union during the 1980s:

“Since selling oil was the source of the Kremlin’s wealth, my father got the Saudis to flood the market with cheap oil.

Lower oil prices devalued the ruble, causing the USSR to go bankrupt, which led to perestroika and Mikhail Gorbachev and the collapse of the Soviet Empire.”

Read more here.

 

Brexit Derangement Hysteria Reaches New Levels

The strongly anti-Brexit, hyper-centralized mainstream media has come back with a new wave of fear mongering while toting the “possibility of a second referendum”, as a “dreaded no-deal scenario” comes closer. It seems likely that the no-deal Brexit scenario won’t happen — Theresa May, under pressure by the Masonic deep state, will likely keep us tied to European treaties, unless her cabinet keeps up the pressure. Several key pro-Brexit ministerial resignations suggests that May has veered towards upending the Brexit process.

The truth is, the UK in the EU is part of a socialist political, social, and economic redistribution and restructuring process that spreads resources across Europe, bolstering a single “European” entity under a bureaucratic and unelected government in Brussels. It’s goal is anti national representation and pro-bloc representation. No single nation is allowed to become too powerful, bureaucratic red tape is laden across anything and everything to disadvantage stronger nations and bolster the weaker, all the while Brussels holds all the influence.

The EU was and is solely an avenue designed to abolish nationhood and form a superstate; big chunks of the British economy are taken to bail out other failing nation states, fund them, and prop them up.

“No erosion of essential national sovereignty”, that was the promise to the UK upon entering the EEC in 1973. This promise has been broken.

The whole arrangement is protectionist while it backdoor floods European nations with rootless third world migrants who will vote to further consolidate European power and erode national identities — the goal being to plummet labor costs and create the next China or India, making Europe an economic powerhouse at the expense of the living standards of the average person.

The media is revving up the propaganda machine and pre-programming the general public into passively accepting a “half-in, half-out” deal which will keep the UK essentially tied to the EU, they do this by putting out material that is extremely negative about the situation to get people’s minds more accustomed to a soft Brexit.

After the new Brexit minister Dominic Raab (now unsurprisingly sidelined by May) claimed that the UK would “thrive” in a no-deal scenario; the media has moved in to redress the narrative — with the aforementioned hysterics.

Jacob Rees-Mogg called the renewed anti-Brexit push “Project Fear on speed”, adding: “It is a fallacy that countries will unilaterally decide to stop selling you their goods.” (The EU doesn’t have federal assent, yet, to impose something like that).

“The idea that food will not get through at Dover is entirely wrong” said Rees-Mogg,

“We would be free to import food, medicines, fuel as we wished and the EU could only stop this if it were to impose sanctions, which is not a credible thought.”

Newly elected populist leader, Matteo Salvini stated that “My experience in the European parliament tells me you either impose yourself or they swindle you,” alluding to Theresa May’s forgoing approach to negotiations.

Salvini, who recently advocated a “League of Leagues” to unite EU govts aiming to ‘defend their borders’, stated that he “will tour capital cities, and not just European ones, to create an alternative to this Europe founded on exploitation… [and] mass immigration.”

Back to Brexit.

So, what has the media concocted this time? Well…

The hysteria is obvious — what is equally clear is that the UK’s assets, economic power, and global influence is tangible, undeniable, and speaks for itself in, or out, of the EU — empty rhetoric, on the other hand, has led many to forget this reality.

If you’re in any doubt about the UK’s situation post-Brexit as the UK moves from EU vassalage arrangements to proper international agreements, read this article for an alternative, more sober take.